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Michael Rosenbaum Online is your oldest fansite dedicated to actor, director, and voice artist Michael Rosenbaum who is widely known for his roles as Lex Luthor in Smallville, Adam in Sorority Boys as well as many other roles in film, TV and animation. We’ll do our best to provide you with all the latest news, pictures, videos and more. Candids and paparazzi pictures will not be featured on this site.

Current Projects


Gigs and album with Rob Danson

Inside of you with Michael Rosenbaum podcast

Where have all the good horror movies gone patreon only Podcast with Jon Heder

Watch his facebook and twitter for updates

Podcasts

Michael now has two Podcasts

In Inside of you Michael talks with friends and tries to find out the deep dark stories that we all want to know!

Please subscribe, share and review and you can do that HERE

Where have all the good horror movies gone is a Patreon only podcast with Jon Heder. They discuss horror movies and if you want more information you can go to Horrorclub

The last  podcast is no longer active, however you can still listen to it. In this podcast Michael and Chris Sullivan talked about positivity and happy talks as well as having a phone line where you could ask for love advice!

You can subscribe, share and review HERE

Michael quotes
  • “Though it`s a small price to pay, shaving my head has opened more doors than I ever thought possible.”
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Site Name: Michael Rosenbaum Online
Online Since: 2010
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MRO is in no way affiliated with Michael. I am just a friendly fan showing my appreciation and dedication towards the amazing actor and comedian. All Photos & Media belong to their respectful owners and are being used under Fair Copyright Law 107. I own none of the images if you would like credit added or any images removed please email. This is a fansite run for no profit and only here to support Michael Rosenbaum and his career.

interview

8 questions with Michael Rosenbaum

impastor6 Lex Luthor is a tough act to follow, a notion that isn’t lost on actor Michael Rosenbaum who portrayed the iconic Superman villain for seven of Smallville’s ten-year run. It was at that point, after having extended his six-year contract by one, that he set out on his own path, believing, as proud as he was of the Luthor role, that he had even more to offer the audience, particularly when it came to humor.

He got a chance to test that theory in the short-lived 2011 series Breaking In, but has really come into his own in Impastor, which is embarking on its second season. Rosenbaum plays Buddy Dobbs, something of a slacker with a gambling debt that is proving detrimental to his health. Running out of options, he’s ready to end it all by jumping off a bridge, but is saved by a young gay reverend who, while doing so, accidentally plunges to his own death. Suddenly Buddy is given new purpose: to take the reverend’s identity and proceeding to the small town the reverend was appointed to that has no idea he isn’t who he claims to be. What follows is his immersing himself in this new life, always looking over his shoulder for the moment when the truth becomes known and he has to flee. Think of it as The Fugitive, but with weed, sex and political incorrectness.

There seemed to be something surprising in you doing a series for TV Land in the States, but here you are, going into your second season.

That was my reaction when my agent gave me the script. He said, “It’s written by Eric Tannenbaum and it’s for TV Land.” I go, “TV Land? Look, man, I love I Dream Of Jeannie and I’m a big Gilligan’s Islandfan, but I don’t want to do a show on TV Land. I don’t want to do that kind of fluff stuff.” They’re, like, “No, they’re changing their network.” I said, “I’ve heard that they’re changing and then you go in there and you can’t say ‘damn.’ You have to say ‘crap.'” But then I read the Impastor script and realized it was really good and we say “cock” on page eight, we say “shit” on page twelve. Buddy’s banging a prostitute. He said, “They want to do the show. They want to make it edgy, they want to make it fun, they want it to be serialized, shot like a movie, not a sitcom.” I went and had a conversation with Eric, who said he wanted me to executive produce the show with him. His words were, “Michael, I want you to be part of the creation. I want you to be part of the casting I want you to be involved in everything.” I didn’t believe they would, but they picked it up.

And then they picked it up for a second season.

Right? And I admire them for being patient and really believing in a show that is, I feel, unique and unlike anything on TV. It doesn’t take itself too seriously, it still has edge, it surprises you, the characters are fun, it’s shot beautifully, it’s serialized, it’s quirky, it’s Fletch-like, it’s easy to watch and it’s only twenty-two minutes of your life. I think that getting people in this oversaturated business where there’s a billion shows, is amazing. Getting people to watch it is the hard part, but when they do, then they tell other people. The truth is, you have only ten episodes nowadays and it’s hard to keep an audience. You come back a year later and try to get the same audience to come back and hope that it grows.

The advantage in the shorter season model in that, yes, you’ve got the opportunity to craft ten really solid episodes, but maintaining that audience is a challenge. On the other hand, much like you had with Smallville, there’s the twenty-two episode season run, which oftentimes has so much filler that it can dilute the dramatic thrust of the season.

How did they do it? How do you write twenty-two episodes a year? That’s ten months a year we’re working. We had freak of the week on Smallville for a while, but how couldn’t you? You can’t write twenty-two brilliant episodes a year. You just can’t do it. It’s hard to write tenbrilliant episodes a year, but if most of your episodes are compelling or good and keep the audience engaged, then you’re in good shape.

In some ways it seems like a tough premise for a series to sustain; the rug could be pulled out from under him at any second.

How Buddy got to this town is the most ridiculous thing you can imagine. He could always just split, but something’s keeps him around. He’s got this house, the town is so small and the people actually believe he’s this guy; they didn’t do any research on him and, on top of it, he’s starting to like some of them. And he’s, like, “Wow, this is the best scam I’ve ever done. I’ve got this prostitute on the side, I can steal some weed, I have to do these crappy sermons every once in a while, I have this beautiful house, I’ve got this assistant who will do anything for me.” At the same time, the keys are always in the ignition, he’s always ready to go if something happens, but there’s something keeps him there. Call it divine intervention, call it whatever you want, I think it’s fun. There’s an article on Zap2it that I always loved because I’m a huge Chevy Chase fan and it said he has a Fletch-like twinkle in his eye … It is kind of an edgy Fletch.

It seems that Buddy is evolving the longer he’s involved with these people, despite still being a bit of an asshole. Do you feel that he’s changing?

I think that Buddy’s so used to getting shit on and then shitting right back on people as a defense mechanism. It’s like when someone says, “Screw you,” you say, “Screw you” back and you get so used to that that he just expects that out of people; he doesn’t expect good out of people. Then he comes to this town and meets someone like Dora, played by Sara Rue, who’s awesome in the show. You know, “There’s just no way she’s this good. Something’s messed up, she’s not this good.” But then he starts to realize that there are good people out there and that kind of messes him up a little bit, because he’s not used to it. Then he starts realizing that some of his actions are actually hurting people. Does that stop him? I don’t know if it stops him, but it might make him… pause. I mean, the guy does have feelings. I think that he doesn’t want to hurt these people, and even wants to bang a few of them.

I also think he wants to make a little money and try to live the high life until he is forced to get out of there or he gets caught. He’s not really a bad guy, I just think he grew up in a bad part of town, he didn’t have a mom and dad around, he didn’t have good role models, and he’s just kind of looking out for himself. If he doesn’t look out for himself, no one else will. If he has to take advantage of something and it hurts someone else, he doesn’t feel great about it, but he tends to do it.

You’re so enthusiastic talking about Impastor but it really has been something of a bumpy road career wise, hasn’t it, since you were so determined to get off of Smallville after season seven?

I remember sitting with Peter Roth, the president of Warner Brothers … I’ve never really told this story. Everybody has an ego and I think everybody likes to get their way. Peter took me to dinner, because he tried to get me to do two more seasons of Smallville. I was very polite and respectful. I said, “Peter, my grandma thinks I’m funny and I’ve always wanted to do comedy, and I started out in comedy, and I was doing tons of comedy, and then I was catapulted into this role that I love and it’s been great, but I was contracted for six years to play Lex Luthor, I did seven, and I’m just ready to move on and I’m just ready to take a new step.” He looked at me and says, “You know, Julianna Margulies, she turned down millions of dollars to stay with ER and look where she is now.” It wasn’t two or three years later where she just made a fortune with The Good Wife and all of that, and her career just took off. I said, “I’m going to bank on my talent. I’m just going to take a chance on me. I think I’ve done this long enough, I did this character for seven years and I just don’t feel like shaving my head for two more years.” I came back for the finale, but at the time I just wanted to take a chance.

The transition was what I thought it would be. I remember Greg Beeman, who directed License to Drive, The Wonder Years and a lot of Smallville episodes, said, “You realize, dude, you’re the only person in the cast that looks different. Once you grow your hair out, you won’t look like you.” I hadn’t thought of that. I called my agent and said, “Hey, set up general meetings with everybody. They need to see me with hair.” We started doing that and then I was cast on Breaking In. Then I directed my first feature [2014’s Back In The Day] with Morena Baccarin, Nick Swardson, and Harland Williams. I couldn’t have done more … Again, I think you really have to know your ability and you have to know who you are. It wasn’t ego, it wasn’t, “I’m not doing Smallville because I’m too good for it.” It was more, “Hey, I’ve got more to offer.” Look, luck is a commodity of preparation and opportunity and I feel like I’m always prepared when that moment comes. I think it comes down to just believing in yourself.

You mentioned that you appeared in the last episode of Smallville. What was your feeling about the way the show ended?

Here’s the thing: I didn’t watch the last three seasons, because I wasn’t in it. Call me egotistical, call me whatever, but that’s the reason I didn’t watch the show. I was working and getting my shit together. But I finally called them up and said, “Hey, look, it’s the last episode ever. I’ll do it, you’ve got me for one day next week.” When I got there I was, like, “What’s happened since I left?” I had no idea what was going on. There were moments where I just didn’t know what the fuck I was doing. I liked my scenes with Tom Welling, but I felt like the show was, for me, done when I left in season seven. Then I sort of did it for the fans and did it for me for closure and to say, “Hey, I did come back.” I did do it, and that’s ultimately why.

Do you realize that this is Smallville’s 15th anniversary?

Holy shit. You just made me feel really old, but I’m proud of it. I have fans all over the world because of that show and I love them. I go to Australia, I go to England…people just embrace it. You can’t be luckier as an actor or as a human being to feel that sort of accomplishment, and if that’s all I did — if I was just Lex Luthor — it would be enough. It really would be enough to go back home to New Berg, Indiana, where there are, like, 3,000 people in the town and where I wasn’t supposed to do anything. To say you were this iconic, legendary character for seven years. I would’ve mowed my lawn with a smile on my face.

Source: empireonline.com – From Smallville to Impastor 8 questions with Michael Rosenbaum

Red Carpet Crash interview

Michael+Rosenbaum+SiriusXM+Entertainment+Weekly+QaG0H0MSX7wlart Michael Rosenbaum is best known for his role as Lex Luther on Smallville. He’s back with season two of Impastor on TV Land on Wednesday nights. We talked about the show, toilet paper and full frontal nudity if the show is renewed.

You can listen to the interview with Michael HERE

‘Grease’ role launched Michael Rosenbaum to success

10428435_473560849467315_6517947424181051214_n BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — Drama class proved to be an easy “A” for Michael Rosenbaum.

He wasn’t interested in the glory or attention. In fact, he didn’t initially participate in any plays.

“I was taking drama classes, but I was still nervous and shy,” he said. “My teacher said — I was a senior — she said, ‘Listen, you can’t take Drama 4 unless you audition for a play.'”

Reluctantly, he agreed to try out for Grease.

“Doesn’t every actor audition for Grease?” he asked.

To his surprise, he landed the part of the dance-show host.

“‘Hey, hey, this is the main brain, Vince Fontaine — spin the sacks of wax here at the house of wax, WAXX,'” Rosenbaum recited. “I still remember because I was sooo nervous.”

He seemed to make a light-year leap from Vince Fontaine to Lex Luthor, the role he played for 10 seasons on the TV series Smallville.

Another seismic revelation is involved in his playing a con man with peerless timing on the TV Land comedy Impastor. A street-wise grifter, the character suddenly finds himself heading a devout Lutheran congregation that mistakes him for the new pastor.

The series has already been renewed for another season.

At age 43, Rosenbaum no longer qualifies as a nervous newcomer.

“If you knew me in high school, I was the shortest kid in high school,” he said. “I didn’t start puberty till late. I didn’t have many friends. I like to call myself ‘ahead of the times.’

“The next morning (after Grease), I was walking down the hallway and a couple of the popular kids said, ‘Hey, you’re pretty funny.’

“So for me, not being me onstage, I could be any weird eccentric; anything I wanted to do onstage, I could do. I didn’t feel like I was being judged. It was my time. And I built slowly through college, doing more plays and off-Broadway. I started to build more confidence, and suddenly I started to realize: ‘Hey, you know what? You might have a career in this!'”

Several people along the way — including his grandmother Ruthie — encouraged him.

In her honor, he wears a tattoo on his arm.

“You need somebody — your grandmother or somebody who believes in you,” he said. “She said, ‘You’re the only one who listens to me.’ . . . I wanted to hear her stories. We’d sit around and talk for hours. I filmed her and interviewed her about her life. She was tough. . . . I learned how to be tough from her.”

Rosenbaum had reached his late 20s when he lost his grandmother.

“Grandma’s death made me cherish the important things more,” he said. “My grandma’s death made me think more about life. People die around you, and, all of a sudden, the world stops and it’s amazing how it takes you back to reality. People say, ‘Do you get over someone’s death?’ You never get over it; you just learn to live with it.”

Although he would like to have a wife and family, Rosenbaum has yet to meet the right woman.

“I had a little dysfunctional family (growing up), and, for me, I always look a little too closely at red flags. I go, ‘Ew, that makes me think of certain things when I was younger.’

“Eventually, I want to have a family, find somebody who’s patient with me. The last girl I went out with was a teacher from Montreal. She was a great girl, but she was too far away. But I don’t give up.”

Source: dispatch.com – Grease role launched Michael Rosenbaum to success

Impastor’s Michael Rosenbaum Thanks the TV Gods, Mulls ‘Super’ Guest Star

One could say that Michael Rosenbaum’s prayers were answered when TV Land’s Impastor came his way. For the Smallville alum not only found in the comedy perhaps “the perfect role” – as a charming, extremely non-religious con man who co-opts the identity and life of a clergyman (who he later learns is gay) — it came on a show that proved to have legs, and as such earned a Season 2 pick-up weeks ahead of this Tuesday’s finale.

In a TV market that is “oversaturated with so many shows, I couldn’t believe how happy I was. I was just elated” about the renewal, Rosenbaum shares. “I know Impastor is hard to find, I know it’s [on at] 10:30, I know it’s the opposite of TV Land, but we were hanging in there, and I could tell that word was spreading.”
On the occasion of Impastor‘s freshman finale, TVLine caught up with Rosenbaum, who currently is on location filming the dark indie comedy Last Days of Summer with William Fichtner.

TVLINE | I was surprised when Impastor first rolled around that there was a bit of a furor over the whole religion thing. Do you feel that has fallen by the wayside since?
You know, we never wanted to make fun of Christianity or homosexuality…. It was just a slice-of-life, funny, goofy comedy, making fun of everybody but in a subtle way. And the people who are religious… I know a pastor where I grew up who’s like, “I’m not offended at all.” He cracked up!

TVLINE | The church is more a backdrop for the show. The same way thatCheers had “types,” all of us know a Dora at our church,
we know an Alden…

Also, Buddy is a fish out of water, and he’s a con man, so the idea isn’t to make fun of Christianity, it’s to take over this pastor’s life, get his money and get out – but then something keeps making him stay. I think people have a propensity to judge a book by its cover, but I’m like, “Watch the show and you’ll see, it has nothing to do with that.”

TVLINE | I mean, has Buddy even set foot in the church since Episode 2?
Right, I had like a couple sermons the whole year. It’s not that he makes fun of religion, it’s that he doesn’t know jack s–t about it. It’s funny because I don’t know jack s–t. either, so it was the perfect role for me.

TVLINE | I love how much the show gets away with. Has there been anything that did not quite make it in?
Man, I’ve managed to put my bare ass in the show three times — so Sara Rue said, “Cut it down to just one ass” if we got renewed. [Laughs] When I read the script, I said TV Land’s not going to do this, there’s no way.
I’m not going to do this because they’re gonna shoot it and then take it all out. But then I went to the guys at [TV Land parent] Viacom and TV Land and they were so supportive. Like, “We want it to be edgy but we don’t want it to feel forced.” So, it’s not like we’retrying to swear, we just wanted to make an original piece of programming where people could sit down and have a laugh and not know where the story is going. And even though some crazy stuff happens – like, Buddy is having sex with a prostitute in the woods when a kid takes his picture and blackmails him – we’re always striving to keep it grounded.

TVLINE | One of the conceits of the show is that in every episode, Buddy comesthisclose to being found out. Has there been a time reading the script when you thought, “Oh, for sure he’ll get caught this time”?
There’s always the element when I read it like, “How is he going to get out of this one?” Like the episode where the Fenwicks are in town and it becomes: How does Buddy meet these people who say they’ve met [the real] Jonathan Barlow before? It’s fun to do that stuff because it’s also difficult, because you have to put a smile on your face but you can’t play it too campy or it becomes too much. But yeah, I love that’s its serialized, that there are always twists and turns.

TVLINE | Speaking of which, last week left us with quite a cliffhanger. Did Taylor Cole murder poor Dora (played by Sara Rue)? Because that’d be sad.
We’ll just have to see, won’t we! [Laughs] But it’s pretty cool how you have all of these elements in play – this guy Damon’s after me, so he hires someone to kill me, and you’ve also got the cops starting to catch up to me…. Everything’s going to come to a head in the finale. There’s a lot that goes on.

TVLINE | I have to imagine someone finds out his secret in the finale. That’d be a logical move. Kind of like how a superhero series
slowly reveals a secret identity.

It’s funny because Alexa (Mircea Monroe) is wondering, “What kind of pastor are you?”

TVLINE | He killed her ex-boyfriend!
I killed this guy! So obviously she knows there’s something odd going on…. Everybody’s had some ideas.

TVLINE | I feel like, storytelling-wise, fun could be had with any scenario. If Alexa finds out, she’d keep quiet since he did her a solid. If it’s Alden (David Rasche), he could blackmail him with the Ashlee/hooker thing….
And if Russell finds out, maybe there’s some heavy petting to buy his silence…. It’s fun because we’ve come full circle. In the pilot, I open the door and the guys who are after me are there. And now that I’ve started to get a little comfortable in town, in the finale it all comes to a head. It’s time for Buddy to get out. Ladner is the best scam he’s ever pulled, but he’s really pushing it at this point, so I think he’s gotta flee.

TVLINE | Speaking of Alden’s affair, I didn’t realize until last week that the actress playing Ashlee is Lindsey Gort aka teenage Samantha on The CW’s The Carrie Diaries.
You know what, Lindsey’s so great. I always say how hard it is to be a guest star but she comes in and just owns it. We’re like, “In one scene you’re behind a tree having sex… and now you’re making out with the president of the church.” That’s the great thing about this show – we really have fun together. Even David Rasche — he is a little older than us but he’s a goofball, too.

TVLINE | Speaking of guest stars, people do love their little “mini-reunions.” Who from Smallville would Smallvilel_Lex-Clarkyou like to see bring their comedy chops toImpastor?
That’s a really good question…. I mean, Tom [Welling] and I are still buddies – I’m a Jew but I had a Christmas tree decorating party last year and he made an ornament and brought it over. So, Tom’s got a really fun, really dry sense of humor…. It’d be a blast if there was something for him.

TVLINE | Like, maybe he’s the onetime BMOC from Ladner College or something….
Yeah! Or he could be a criminal in town. Tom would be a blast. I also think Annette O’Toole (who played Martha) is really funny, she could be hilarious. And Allison Mack (Chloe)…. Any of those guys, we’d be lucky to have them.

What I like is that my peers will send me an email – “Dude, I could play a rival pastor!” People want to be on the show and that really excites me. It means we’re doing something right. But you know what the best thing is? I used to think, “You want everybody to watch a show,” but now success for me — and I’m not giving you a fake sermon here! — is working and being happy with what you’re doing. If you can wake up every morning and enjoy work. I’m 43 years old now, so I’m very appreciative in my older age!

Source: tvline.com – Impastor’s Michael Rosenbaum thanks the TV gods, mulls super guest star